Title
Lookup in dependent base classes
Status
tc1
Section
17.7.2 [temp.dep]
Submitter
John Spicer

Created on 2000-03-10.00:00:00 last changed 208 months ago

Messages

Date: 2000-04-15.00:00:00

Proposed resolution (10/00):

  1. In 17.7.2 [temp.dep] paragraph 3, replace

    In the definition of a class template or in the definition of a member of such a template that appears outside of the template definition, if a base class of this template depends on a template-parameter, the base class scope is not examined during name lookup until the class template is instantiated.

    with

    In the definition of a class template or a member of a class template, if a base class of the class template depends on a template-parameter, the base class scope is not examined during unqualified name lookup either at the point of definition of the class template or member or during an instantiation of the class template or member.
  2. Remove from 17.7.2 [temp.dep] paragraph 4:

    If a base class is a dependent type, a member of that class cannot hide a name declared within a template, or a name from the template's enclosing scopes.
Date: 2004-09-10.00:00:00

Paragraphs 3-4 of 17.7.2 [temp.dep] say, in part,

if a base class of [a class] template depends on a template-parameter, the base class scope is not examined during name lookup until the class template is instantiated... If a base class is a dependent type, a member of that class cannot hide a name declared within a template, or a name from the template's enclosing scope.

John Spicer: The wording in paragraph 4 seems particularly odd to me. It essentially changes the order in which scopes are considered. If a scope outside of the template declares a given name, that declaration hides entities of the same name from template dependent base classes (but not from nondependent base classes).

In the following example, the calls of f and g are handled differently because B::f cannot hide ::f, but B::g doesn't try to hide anything, so it can be called.

    extern "C" int printf(char *, ...);
    template <class T> struct A : T {
        void h(T t) {
            f(t);  // calls ::f(B)
            g(t);  // calls B::g
        }
    };

    struct B {
        void f(B){printf("%s", "in B::f\n");}
        void g(B){printf("%s", "in B::g\n");}
    };

    void f(B){printf("%s", "in ::f\n");}

    int main()
    {
        A<B> ab;
        B b;
        ab.h(b);
    }

I don't think the current wording in the standard provides a useful facility. The author of class A can't be sure that a given call is going to call a base class function unless the base class is explicitly specified. Adding a new global function could cause the program to suddenly change meaning.

What I thought the rule was is, "If a base class is a dependent type a member of that class is not found by unqualified lookup".

Derek Inglis: My understanding is the same except that I'd remove the word "qualified" from your sentence.

Erwin Unruh: My interpretation is based on 17.7.4 [temp.dep.res] and especially 17.7.4.2 [temp.dep.candidate] (and largely on my memory of the discussions). For all unqualified names you do something like the following algorithm:

  1. check whether it is a dependent function call
  2. Do a lookup in the definition context and remember what you found there
  3. Do a Koenig-Lookup at instantiation time
  4. perform overloading if necessary

Regarding names from base classes you cannot find them in 2) because you don't know what base class you have. You cannot find them in 3) because members of classes are not found by Koenig lookup (only namespaces are considered). So you don't find them at all (for unqualified names).

For a qualified name, you start lookup for each 'part' of the qualification. Once you reach a dependent part, you stop and continue lookup at the instantiation point. For example:

    namespace A {
      namepace B {
	template <class T> class C {
	  template <class U> class D {
	    typedef int E;
	    // ...
	  };
	};
      };
    };

    template <class T> class F : public T {
      typename A::B::C<int>::D<T>::E var1;
      typename A::B::C<T>::D<int>::E var2;
      typename F::T::X var3;
    }

For var1 you do lookup for A::B::C<int>::D at definition time, for var2 you only do lookup for A::B::C. The rest of the lookup is done at instantiation time since specialisations could change part of the lookup. Similarly the lookup for var3 stops after F::T at definition time.

My impression was that an unqualified name never refers to a name in a dependent base class.

(See also issue 197.)

History
Date User Action Args
2003-04-25 00:00:00adminsetstatus: dr -> tc1
2000-11-18 00:00:00adminsetstatus: ready -> dr
2000-05-21 00:00:00adminsetmessages: + msg327
2000-03-10 00:00:00admincreate